Forced reminiscence

January 30, 2012 at 12:36 pm
filed under research

Songs that were heard by patients suffering epilepsy during naturally occurring or artificially induced seizures, circa 1963.

  1. ‘White Christmas’ (Case 4). Sung by a choir
  2. ‘Rolling Along Together’ Not identified by patient, but recognised by operating-room nurse when patient hummed it on stimulation
  3. ‘Hush-a-Bye Baby’ (Case 6). Sung by mother, but also thought to be theme-tune for radio-programme
  4. ‘A song he had heard before, a popular one on the radio’ (Case 10)
  5. ‘Oh Marie, Oh Marie’ (Case 30).
  6. The theme-song of a radio-programme   ‘The War March of the Priests’ (Case 31).
  7. This was on the other side of the ‘Hallelujah Chorus’ on a record belonging to the patient
  8. ‘Mother and father singing Christmas carols’ (Case 32)
  9. ‘Music from Guys and Dolls’ (Case 37)
  10. ‘A song she had heard frequently on the radio’ (Case 45)
  11. ‘I’ll Get By’ and ‘You’ll Never Know’ (Case 46).
  12. Songs he had often heard on the radio In each case—as with Mrs O’M.—the music was fixed and stereotyped. The same tune (or tunes) were heard again and again, whether in the course of spontaneous seizures.

Penfield W. and Perot P. “The brain’s record of visualand auditory experience: a final summary and discussion.” Brain (1963)